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Written Statement - Chapter 11 - Retailing

11.1    Introduction

11.1.1 Retailing has been one of the most dynamic sectors of the UK economy although retail growth has slowed significantly in recent years. Channelled correctly this growth can make an important contribution towards the economy of the Mansfield area and bring about significant benefits for the local population.

11.1.2 In common with other areas, the pattern of retail provision in Mansfield District has continuously evolved. In recent years the growth of out of centre foodstores and retail warehousing (particularly bulky durable goods) has impacted on the town centre and the other established shopping centres throughout the District. Despite the pressures for retail decentralisation, these traditional centres remain the main focus of shopping activity. They are centrally located, affording relatively easy access by all sections of the community and offer the opportunity to combine shopping trips with work and leisure activities. The continuing health and prosperity of the town and district centres, however, relies on their ability to adapt to change, in order to remain competitive and attractive to shoppers.

11.1.3 Town centre retailing has become dominated by multiple groups trading under several distinct formats. The preference of these groups is increasingly towards clear trading space of a regular shape, with good servicing. These large groups, because of their variety, are able to adopt a more innovative approach to the selling of different product lines from the same store. There is clear evidence that multiple retailers are seeking increased representation in Mansfield town centre and there is a requirement for somewhat larger stores than those which are currently available. During the 1980's, the concept of 'speciality shopping' emerged, with retailers selling several lines of a single product item. Whilst the growth of speciality shopping has not been sustained, there is now a clear recognition of the important role that small, often independent, retailers have in providing specialist goods and services.

11.1.4 The terms 'convenience' and 'comparison' goods, referred to in this chapter are defined by Planning Policy Guidance Note 6, (PPG 6):-        

- Convenience: goods such as food, newspapers and drinks, which tend to be purchased regularly and for which convenience of purchase is therefore important.

- Comparison: goods such as clothes and electrical equipment, for which the consumer generally expects to invest time and effort into visiting a range of shops before making a choice.

11.1.5 Traditional town centres have clearly been affected by the changes in shopping patterns. There has been a marked loss of convenience floorspace from town centres and some centres do not now fulfil this traditional role. The growth of retail warehouses has also led to the decline of the sale of bulky, durable goods in the high street. Town centres which have failed to adapt have declined under the competition. This has resulted in vacant floorspace. Others have modernised, refurbished and diversified, giving more space over to leisure and community facilities to enhance their retail function. Investor confidence in town centres is also strengthened when it is perceived that a local authority is taking steps to make the centre more attractive. The quality of the design of buildings, good car parking facilities, pedestrianisation schemes and landscaping all play a role in improving the image of shopping areas.

11.1.6 Town centres have an important role to play with regard to sustainable development. Trips to shops are often combined with visits to other services such as banks, estate agents and leisure facilities. This reduces the number of car trips, which thus saves energy. The District's shopping centres have benefited from considerable public and private investment to improve the quality of the services and facilities offered to improve the environment and to consolidate their functions. Planning policies will strive to make the best use of this investment.

11.1.7 Latest estimates from the Unit for Retail Planning Information (U.R.P.I.) contained in Brief 97/2 indicate that growth in expenditure on comparison goods is likely to rise by 3.57% per annum and on convenience goods by 0.31% per annum (both long term trends). Although this rate of growth may not necessarily be achieved, as it is closely tied to the health of the economy, levels of new growth will, undoubtedly, need to be accommodated. If the District is to maintain and enhance its share of comparison expenditure, based on these assumptions, then approximately £84.5 million (1993 prices) of new turnover would need to be accommodated in the District by 2006.

11.1.8 The District Council considers that the majority of available expenditure on comparison goods, during the Plan period, should be accommodated within Mansfield town centre, in order to preserve and enhance its role as a sub-regional centre. Elsewhere, new floorspace will take the form of traditional shop units within district and local centres. It is likely, however, that there will be an expansion of the retail warehouse sector.

11.1.9  In the Spring of 1995, Hillier Parker undertook a retail study of Mansfield, to assess the scope for new retail development and the appropriate balance to be struck between town centre and retail warehouse floorspace, in accordance with current and emerging Government guidance. Hillier Parker's assessment of the various indicators of vitality and viability point to Mansfield under-performing for a town of its size, although it has a below average level of vacant shop units. Zone A rental levels, however, are falling at a faster rate than the East Midland or national average. Investment yields suggest that Mansfield is performing in line with the All Shops average but below the average yield for the East Midlands. Representation from national multiple retailers is limited. Many of the national multiple retailers in Mansfield are located in sub-standard units, which does not compare favourably with other towns, where they are located in larger or more attractive units. The lack of suitable units is reflected in the lack of interest to gain representation from national multiple retailers not currently represented in the District. There is also evidence of decline in total pedestrian flows in the town centre.

11.1.10         Hillier Parker's study concluded that the White Hart Street area, in Mansfield town centre (see policies in the Central Areas Chapter), offers the best opportunity for securing a town centre comparison goods retailing scheme. In contrast, the study views the more peripheral location of the Clumber Street site (see Central Areas Chapter) as less attractive, although its current role as a car park could be expanded to reinforce pedestrian flows along Regent Street into the town centre and thereby strengthen the function of the north side of the town centre. In common with the Magistrates Court Site (see Central Areas Chapter), it provides a possible location for more limited edge-of-centre retail development, possibly including a discount food retailer.

11.1.11          The study recognised the pressure for retail warehouse development in the District. It concludes that the Field Mill / Portland Sidings site offers the best opportunity for an integrated retail park to be developed and the only prospect for links to the town centre.

11.1.12          The combination of new retail developments in the centre of Mansfield on the White Hart Street site, together with a retail warehouse development at Field Mill/ Portland Sidings would provide a more integrated retail location, with improved pedestrian flows in the southern part of the town centre, especially from Portland Sidings through to the very centre of Mansfield at the Market Place.

11.2    The Shopping Hierarchy

11.2.1 The shopping hierarchy in the District is based on five broad categories and forms the basis of the District Council's retail strategy.

11.2.2 Mansfield town centre, which includes the 'sub regional centre', dominates shopping provision within the Plan area. It is a sub-regional comparison shopping centre with an extensive catchment area in West Nottinghamshire and East Derbyshire. It contains approximately 93,000m2 of retail and service floorspace. In 1986 it had a total turnover of around £126 million. The District Council's retail strategy seeks to promote Mansfield town centre as a sub-regional centre.

11.2.3 There are three 'district centres'; two based on historic town centres at Mansfield Woodhouse and Market Warsop and one recently developed centre based around a food superstore at Oak Tree. These serve major residential areas within Mansfield and the immediately adjacent areas. They are primarily used for convenience shopping, with some comparison shopping and also provide a range of other services. The District Council's retail strategy seeks to maintain and further develop district centres.

11.2.4 'Local centres' are principally concerned with the sale of food and other convenience goods to the local community in which they are located. They also provide a limited range of other services and play an important role in providing for the day to day needs of local communities, in particular, for the less mobile of these communities such as the elderly and non-car owners. Shopping areas such as these are also vital in that they act as focal points for various community facilities.

11.2.5 'Neighbourhood parades' serve their immediate locality and usually consist of four or more shop units, located together in a parade or group. They may not be particularly important individually, but on a collective basis, they account for a large number of shop units. They command a small but significant proportion of convenience expenditure in the District. However, these centres have suffered severely as a result of the growth of superstores. They are considered vitally important to certain sections of the community, such as those on low incomes and the less mobile. These groups include the elderly, the disabled and single parent families with young children.

11.2.6 'Individual shops' serve immediately adjacent residential areas.

11.2.7 In addition to the hierarchy outlined above, the District of Mansfield contains a free standing Morrisons Superstore on Sutton Road, which has a wide catchment area covering both Mansfield and Ashfield and a Safeway superstore off Nottingham Road, to the south of the town centre. The District also supports a range of non-food retail warehouses, which are generally situated at locations highly accessible by private car. The catchment area of retail warehouses is typically very large and they account for a large proportion of an area's expenditure on the primary goods which they sell.

11.3    Structure Plan Context

11.3.1 In relation to Mansfield District, the Nottinghamshire Structure Plan Review aims to:-

- Maintain and enhance Mansfield town centre's role as a sub-regional centre;

- Make provision for the appropriate expansion of the district centres at Mansfield Woodhouse, Oak Tree and Warsop;           

- Resist proposals for major out of centre retail developments unless they meet certain criteria.

11.4    Objectives

11.4.1 Achieve sustainable retail development sites to take advantage of existing centres, to serve concentrations of people and locations which will minimise the need to travel large distances.

11.4.2 Ensure a variety of shopping sites and facilities are available to cater for both the car-borne shopper and those on foot or those who rely on public transport, in specific identified locations and to ensure the facilities are accessible to all.

11.4.3 Protect and enhance the role of defined shopping centres and to maintain their vitality and viability.

11.4.4 Ensure new development is directed to specific sites and will not harm existing shopping centres.

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

11.5    Mansfield Sub-Regional Centre

11.5.1 Mansfield town centre serves an extensive catchment area in West Nottinghamshire and East Derbyshire, serving nearly 300,000 people. Its primary role is in terms of shopping for comparison goods. It also has a strong role as a food shopping centre.

R1      

WITHIN THE MANSFIELD SUB-REGIONAL CENTRE, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT (USE CLASS A1), OFFICES AND OTHER CENTRAL AREA FACILITIES WHERE THEY WOULD SUSTAIN AND ENHANCE THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE CENTRE.

WITHIN THE REMAINDER OF THE TOWN CENTRE, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR OFFICES, HOUSING, INDUSTRY (USE CLASS B1) AND OTHER CENTRAL AREA FACILITIES TO ENCOURAGE DIVERSIFICATION OF USES. RETAIL DEVELOPMENT WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE IT IS WELL RELATED TO THE SUB-REGIONAL CENTRE, CLOSELY INTEGRATED WITH EXISTING RETAIL DEVELOPMENT AND LOCATED WITHIN EASY WALKING DISTANCE OF THE PRIMARY SHOPPING AREA.

RETAIL PROPOSALS SHOULD NOT SERIOUSLY UNDERMINE THE VITALITY OR VIABILITY OF OTHER SMALLER CENTRES IN NEIGHBOURING DISTRICTS.

Note

Shopping uses refer to Class A1 of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987. The types of businesses which fall into this category are:- for the retail sale of goods other than hot food, post offices, travel and ticket agencies, sandwich bars, hairdressers, undertakers, dry cleaners and domestic hire shops.

The types of business which fall into Class A2, Financial and Professional Services (other than health or medical services) are any other services (including use as a betting office) which it is appropriate to provide in a shopping area, where the services are provided principally to visiting members of the public.

The types of businesses which fall within Class A3 of the U.C.O. (Food and Drink) are use for the sale of food or drink for consumption on the premises or hot food for consumption off the premises.

11.5.2 Despite the current downturn in the economic climate of the District, during the Plan period expenditure per head on comparison goods is expected to grow at a rate of approximately 3.5% per annum. Investment in existing shopping centres will attract further expenditure and will strengthen Mansfield's role as a sub-regional centre.

11.5.3 The town centre has adapted to compete with current trends through improvements to the shopping environment, particularly through pedestrianisation schemes and environmental improvements. Initiatives such as grants for building 'facelifts', car parking improvements and the very successful 'Shopmobility' scheme have all contributed to an improvement in the town centre's shopping environment.

11.5.4 In recent years, the growth of Mansfield town centre as a shopping centre has been uncertain. This is attributed to specific factors such as the lack of suitable accommodation, lack of room for expansion and the presence of out-of-centre retailing. Detailed policies that address these issues are contained in the Central Areas Chapter. They illustrate the determination of this authority to further enhance Mansfield town centre's role as a sub-regional centre by the identification of a variety of development sites and the continuation of a programme of environmental improvements. This includes street-scene treatment, landscaping and improvements to individual buildings via facelift and conservation partnership grants. Better car parking and improved public transport services will also be pursued during the Plan period.

11.5.5 Mansfield town centre has not grown and expanded in its retail function at the same rate as other centres. The town centre has suffered because existing centres such as Nottingham, Chesterfield, and Newark have undergone expansion in the range and quality of retail provision. The development of the Meadowhall complex north of Sheffield has also significantly affected retail competition in the area. The Central Areas Chapter contains a range of proposals for major retail development such as White Hart Street. The development of these sites will enable Mansfield to compete successfully with other centres.

11.5.6 Mansfield town centre provides the focus of retail activity within the District and in order to maximise accessibility to shopping facilities, the District Council will seek to concentrate new retail development within the sub-regional centre defined on the proposals map. Comparison shopping is the mainstay of retailing in Mansfield's shopping centre and the Council will actively promote the development of new comparison floorspace in the centre with the object of sustaining and enhancing its vitality and viability. Within this area, provided that there is not conflict with other policies and proposals in this Plan, planning applications for associated retail services such as banks, building societies and other professional services, restaurants and cafes will also be granted.

11.5.7 Developments considered to be acceptable in strengthening the role of the sub-regional centre would include retail, office, residential, community and leisure uses appropriate to the town centre, e.g. hotels, health centres, flats and indoor sports facilities. The District Council will encourage and undertake the implementation of environmental improvements, including landscaping, traffic management, parking /servicing and facelift conservation schemes. Improved access to the town centre will be sought, particularly with regard to public transport proposals and pedestrian / cycle routes. The District Council also accepts that complimentary uses such as leisure / entertainment facilities, office development and in appropriate cases, residential development can also contribute towards improving the vitality of the sub-regional centre. The above uses are all acceptable central area facilities.

11.6    District Centres

11.6.1 In order for district centres to maintain their current role and status, it is essential that new investment be attracted. In the context of district centres, retail and central area facilities include hairdressers, dry cleaners etc., financial and professional services and food and drink outlets. Proposals satisfying this policy would also have to comply with other relevant Local Plan policies.

R2      

WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DISTRICT CENTRES, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT, OFFICES AND OTHER CENTRAL AREA FACILITIES WHERE THEY WOULD SUSTAIN AND ENHANCE THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THESE CENTRES.

Note    For a full definition of the Use Classes Order, see note at the end of Policy R1.

R2(A)              MANSFIELD WOODHOUSE DISTRICT CENTRE.

11.6.2 Woodhouse centre is primarily a convenience shopping centre anchored by the 3,066m2 Co-operative Foodstore. Just over half of the shops in Woodhouse are located in Woodhouse centre. This comprises an elongated shopping street stretching for nearly half a mile along High Street and Station Street between Albert Square and Priory Square. There is a concentration of units located towards the western end of High Street adjacent to the Market Place. The shopping centre corresponds to the former village street of Woodhouse. Most shops are located in old stone buildings which were formerly houses. As a consequence, the centre is characterised by small shop units. Many of the buildings are of architectural or historic interest or have particular townscape value. The designation of an Action Area in the central area of Woodhouse in 1983 helped to bring about the development of the Co-operative Superstore. This stimulated a considerable increase in the turnover of the centre in the early 1980's. The District Council considers it of major importance that shopping in Woodhouse continues to grow. Detailed policies and proposals can be found in the Central Areas Chapter.

R2(B)              MARKET WARSOP DISTRICT CENTRE.

11.6.3 Market Warsop has an important role as a retail centre, serving a catchment population of over 13,000 people. These are drawn almost entirely from households in Market Warsop, Warsop Vale, Church Warsop, Meden Vale and Spion Kop. Over the last decade Market Warsop's role has been threatened by a number of factors outlined below. With increased personal mobility and the development of large foodstores and retail warehouses in Mansfield and Worksop, Warsop households have a greater degree of choice. Other similar sized centres such as Ollerton, Shirebrook and Mansfield Woodhouse have also expanded with the development of medium sized foodstores, further adding to the choice of centres. Secondly, the strong link between the Warsop communities and the mining industry is now beginning to have repercussions for the prosperity of the commercial centre following the closure of Warsop Main Colliery. This has led to high levels of unemployment and declining levels of disposable income locally with the knock on effect of a decline in Market Warsop as a retail centre.

11.6.4 The retail core is now centred around the Sherwood Street/High Street/Burns Lane/ Church Street junction. Despite these pressures, it remains an important retail centre selling mainly convenience goods. The most significant development over the last decade has been the construction of the Kwik Save foodstore on Burns Lane (620m2). Other smaller retail units have been developed on Sherwood Street providing a further 420m2 of floorspace. The District Council considers it of great importance that Warsop's role as a convenience centre for local people should continue, but it must expand and diversify in order to keep existing trade and attract the expenditure lost over the last decade to rival centres. Market Warsop is the most accessible location for the local community both in terms of private and public transport and as such the objective of this Local Plan is to capitalise on existing investment and to facilitate the improvement of the Centre. More detailed policies and proposals for Warsop can be found in the Central Areas Chapter.

R2(C)              OAK TREE DISTRICT CENTRE.

11.6.5 This is a planned district centre, completed in the late 1970's, which includes smaller retail units. It experiences high turnover/floorspace ratios principally because of the presence of the Tesco Foodstore and the lack of competition in the immediate area. Planning permission will be granted for a limited amount of non-food retailing within the defined centre. Such development will need to make provision for adequate additional parking/ servicing, maintain satisfactory access to the centre for pedestrians and non-car borne users and compensate for any loss of recreational facilities.

11.7    Local Centres

11.7.1 The District Council will undertake all measures it considers necessary to ensure that the vitality and viability of the three defined local centres is maintained.

R3      

WITHIN THE FOLLOWING CENTRES, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR SHOPPING DEVELOPMENT (USE CLASS A1) AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES (USE CLASS A2 AND A3) WHERE THEY WOULD SUSTAIN AND ENHANCE THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THESE CENTRES.

R3(A)              CLIPSTONE ROAD WEST LOCAL CENTRE.

R3(B)              NEWGATE LANE / RATCLIFFE GATE LOCAL CENTRE.

R3(C)              LADYBROOK LANE LOCAL CENTRE.

Note    For a full definition of the Use Classes Order, see note at the end of Policy R1.

11.7.2 The three local centres all provide valuable shopping facilities for the communities which they serve. The District Council is anxious to sustain and enhance the vitality and viability of the centres. Planning permission will therefore be granted for retail development and associated non-retail services within the above centres, provided that such development does not conflict with other policies and proposals of the Local Plan. Associated services in the context of local centres would include services such as hairdressers, dry cleaners etc. financial and professional services and food and drink outlets, as defined in the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987.

11.7.3 The District Council recognises that other developments such as community and leisure / entertainment facilities could also contribute towards strengthening local centres. The District Council will also encourage the implementation of environmental improvements in these centres. Improved accessibility will be sought, particularly with respect to public transport services and pedestrian / cycle routes.

11.8    Neighbourhood Parades

11.8.1 The District Council will adopt all measures it considers necessary to ensure that the vitality and viability of the twelve defined neighbourhood parades is maintained.

R4      

WITHIN THE FOLLOWING NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADES, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT (USE CLASS A1) AND ASSOCIATED USES (USE CLASS A2 AND A3) WHERE THEY WOULD SUSTAIN AND ENHANCE THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE PARADES.

R4(A)              CARTER LANE (EVEN NOS. 62A- 74 AND 104-112) NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(B)              CHESTERFIELD ROAD NORTH (EVEN NOS. 104-116) NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(C)              CHESTERFIELD ROAD SOUTH (ODD NOS. 203-221) NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(D)              COX'S LANE /BROWN AVENUE NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(E)              EGMANTON ROAD NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(F)              GARIBALDI ROAD (ODD NOS. 21-31) NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE

R4(G)              HARROP WHITE ROAD (EVEN NOS. 42-56) NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE

R4(H)              LING FOREST ROAD NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(I)               PECKS HILL NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(J)              RAVENSDALE ROAD, NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(K)              OSSINGTON CLOSE NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

R4(L)              NOTTINGHAM ROAD NEIGHBOURHOOD PARADE.

Note    For a full definition of the Use Classes Order, see note at the end Policy R1

11.8.2 Neighbourhood parades are small groups of shops which fulfill an important role in providing local shopping facilities for nearby residential areas. Developments considered to be acceptable in promoting the consolidation and enhancement of neighbourhood parades include retail services such as newsagents, hairdressers, dry cleaners etc., associated financial services and food and drink outlets. The development of community and leisure facilities may also play a role in enhancing the vitality of these centres, as would the improvement of the environment and parking facilities. Proposals satisfying this policy would also need to meet the criteria contained in Policy R7.

11.8.3 Developments considered to be acceptable in promoting the consolidation and enhancement of the above twelve neighbourhood parades would involve retail (up to a unit size of 750m2) and environmental improvements including landscaping and traffic management / parking facilities.

11.9    Retail Warehousing

R5      

LAND AT PORTLAND SIDINGS WILL BE THE PREFERRED LOCATION FOR RETAIL WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT FOR WHICH NO SUITABLE SITES CAN BE FOUND WITHIN OR ON THE EDGE OF MANSFIELD TOWN CENTRE. PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR SUCH DEVELOPMENT AND ASSOCIATED LEISURE AND A3 USES ON THIS SITE PROVIDED THAT THE DEVELOPMENT MEETS ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        IT FORMS AN INTEGRATED, COMPREHENSIVE SCHEME INCORPORATING SHARED PARKING AND PROVISION FOR CYCLISTS AND PEDESTRIANS;

2)        IT PROVIDES A FOOTBRIDGE OVER THE RING ROAD AND PEDESTRIAN LINKS TO THE RAILWAY STATION;

3)        THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT LEAD TO A NET LOSS OF INDUSTRIAL FLOORSPACE IN MANSFIELD;

4)        THE NET RETAIL WAREHOUSE FLOORSPACE WOULD NOT EXCEED 12,000 SQUARE METRES AND WOULD BE DEVELOPED IN PHASES;

5)        THE MINIMUM SIZE OF INDIVIDUAL RETAIL WAREHOUSES WOULD BE 929 SQUARE METRES, UNLESS IT CAN CLEARLY BE DEMONSTRATED THAT A SMALLER UNIT IS ESSENTIAL TO ACCOMMODATE A USER WHO CANNOT BE LOCATED ON A SITE WITHIN OR ON THE EDGE OF MANSFIELD TOWN CENTRE;

6)        THE NET SALES AREA OF ANY RETAIL WAREHOUSE ON THE SITE WOULD BE PREDOMINANTLY DEVOTED TO THE SALE OF BULKY DURABLE GOODS

AN ELEMENT OF BUSINESS OR INDUSTRIAL USE (USE CLASS B1 AND B2) AND / OR A HOTEL USE WOULD BE ACCEPTABLE AS PART OF A COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE.

THE COUNCIL WILL ENSURE THESE CRITERIA ARE MET, EITHER BY IMPOSING APPROPRIATE CONDITIONS ON ANY PERMISSION, OR, WHERE NECESSARY, BY NEGOTIATING A SECTION 106 AGREEMENT.

Note   For a full definition of the Use Classes Order, see note at paragraph 3.7.4 and at the end of Policy R1.

11.9.1 This site to the immediate south of the railway with direct links to the new railway station is largely clear of development. In view of its close proximity to the town centre the site is felt to be particularly appropriate for an integrated retail warehouse/ leisure development. The site includes a group of recently completed units off Highfield Way. If these units are lost through development, it will be necessary for replacement units to be provided, either within the site, or at an alternative location. The site adjoins existing industrial areas and an element of industrial or business use would be acceptable as part of the comprehensive redevelopment of the site. The provision of an hotel on the front part of the site between Highfield Way and Wharf Road would be acceptable. It is also expected that ancillary leisure facilities and appropriate A3 uses, such as restaurants and or cafes, will be developed in conjunction with the retail warehousing. The District Council has prepared a Development Brief for the area which provides detailed information on the preferred land uses / locations, development requirements and design issues.

11.9.2 Portland Sidings has the advantage of being closer to the town centre than the existing cluster of retail warehouses on Nottingham Road. It offers the only opportunity to generate linked shopping trips between the town centre and a retail park. The intention is to provide an integrated comprehensive development of the site. The joint use of car parking areas would be encouraged. Pedestrian and cycle links should also be provided, including a footbridge over the Inner Ring Road to strengthen the relationship between the site and the sub-regional centre. The Council will seek to negotiate a section 106 agreement to ensure that the footbridge and pedestrian links to the railway station are provided.

11.9.3 In order to maintain and enhance Mansfield town centre's role as a sub-regional centre, it is important that a balance is achieved between town centre development and retail warehousing. The District Council wishes to concentrate most of the new comparison goods shopping developed during the Plan period within Mansfield town centre but accepts that bulky durable goods requiring large showroom space could be sold in retail warehouses in the Portland Sidings area. In order to maintain an appropriate balance it is the Council's view that net retail floorspace on this site should not exceed 12,000sq. metres. It is also considered that it would be preferable for the provision of this floorspace to be phased over the Plan period to ensure that it does not outstrip the necessary growth in trade retention. Net retail floorspace will be taken to include any area of floorspace which is used in whole or in part for the sale of goods to the public.

11.9.4 In order to ensure that the retail element of the proposed development only provides for retailers requiring large showrooms, which could not be accommodated on sites within or on the edge of the town centre, individual retail units should generally be of a minimum size of 929sq. metres. However, smaller units will be allowed as an exception where there is clear evidence that they are essential to accommodate an appropriate retail use for which no suitable site or premises exist either within or on the edge of the town centre. The Council will also seek to restrict the sale of non-bulky goods (e.g. food, confectionery, clothing (including sportswear and children's clothing), shoes, toys, fashion accessories (including handbags and luggage), watches and jewellery, perfume and toiletries, books, computer software, music records, video and audio tapes) by imposing appropriate conditions on any planning permission that is granted for the site.

11.10  Locations for Retail Developments

11.10.1          Overall retail strategy is to direct investment to those centres identified in the retail hierarchy. Shops by their very nature attract vehicular and pedestrian traffic and can alter the character of an area, particularly residential areas. For the policy of concentrating development to defined centres to be effective, new retail developments outside of them will need to be strictly controlled.

R6      

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS (OTHER THAN LOCAL SHOPS SELLING CONVENIENCE GOODS TO THE IMMEDIATELY ADJOINING AREA) OUTSIDE EXISTING CENTRES, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP UNLESS IT CAN BE CLEARLY DEMONSTRATED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THERE ARE NO OTHER SUITABLE LOCATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE FIRST INSTANCE WITHIN A DEFINED CENTRE OR IN THE SECOND INSTANCE AT THE EDGE OF A DEFINED CENTRE;

2)        THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT DIRECTLY, OR WHEN CONSIDERED WITH OTHER DEVELOPMENTS, SERIOUSLY AFFECT THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF ANY NEARBY CENTRE;

3)        THE DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT PREJUDICE FUTURE INVESTMENT IN EXISTING CENTRES OR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF LOCAL PLAN POLICIES;

4)        THE DEVELOPMENT WILL BE WELL SERVED BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICES AND BE EASILY AND SAFELY ACCESSIBLE FOR PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS;

5)        THE DEVELOPMENT WILL REDUCE THE NEED TO TRAVEL, ESPECIALLY BY CAR;

6)        THE DEVELOPMENT WILL INTEGRATE WITH SURROUNDING LAND USES AND MAKE PROVISION FOR EFFECTIVE PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTS;

WHERE NECESSARY THE COUNCIL WILL IMPOSE CONDITIONS TO CONTROL THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF RETAIL FLOORSPACE, THE MINIMUM SIZE OF UNIT AND THE TYPE OF GOODS SOLD IN ORDER TO SAFEGUARD THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF EXISTING CENTRES.

11.10.2          Shopping centres are defined on the Proposals map. Any planning applications for retail developments outside defined centres will be considered with regard to the above criteria.

11.10.3          PPG6 makes clear that commercial competition, as such is not a land use planning consideration. It does, however state that account should be taken of the possible impact of a development on the vitality and viability of any nearby town centre as a whole, as well as other factors. Planning permission will not be granted for retail developments that would be likely to prejudice future private sector investment in a shopping centre where such investment would be required to safeguard its vitality and viability. The District Council's retail strategy seeks to direct future retail development / investment to defined centres, where there exists a range of services within a 'core' area, concentration of public / private sector investment and to where access is provided by public transport. Any proposal which would put this strategy at risk would not be permitted.

11.10.4          In accordance with Government guidance, the District Council supports the 'sequential' approach to retail developments. Preference will, therefore, be for new retail proposals to be located within defined centres, followed by sites on the edge of defined centres. If no such sites are available, only then would out of centre sites be considered, but only if they were or could be made, accessible by a choice of means of transport.

11.10.5          Sites will be regarded as being on the edge of Mansfield town centre if they are within an easy walking distance of the primary shopping area as defined on the proposals map, taking into account the size and nature of the development proposal, its relationship to the centre as a whole and the quality of the pedestrian routes between the development and the primary shopping area.

11.10.6          The District Council supports Government aims to reduce transport emissions of carbon dioxide and air pollutants. As such, therefore, new retail developments which would result in the generation of unnecessary journeys by private car will not be permitted. In addition, the District Council will expect all new retail developments to integrate with existing retail centres/facilities and make provision for effective pedestrian and cycle movements.

R7      

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        BE OF A SCALE WHICH IS CONSISTENT WITH THE SIZE OF THE DEFINED CENTRE IN WHICH IT IS SITUATED OR TO WHICH IT RELATES;

2)        INTEGRATE WITH THE EXISTING PATTERN OF SETTLEMENT AND SURROUNDING LAND USES;

3)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OF THE SURROUNDING AREA;

4)        NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE AMENITIES OF NEARBY OCCUPIERS;

5)        HAVE A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN AND LAYOUT, PARTICULARLY WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF MATERIALS AND MASSING OF BUILDINGS;

6)        INCORPORATE SITE CHARACTERISTICS/ FEATURES WHICH MAKE AN IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTION TO THE TOWNSCAPE;

7)        MAKE PROVISION FOR THE NEEDS OF THE DISABLED, ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH YOUNG CHILDREN AND INCLUDE RELEVANT CRIME PREVENTION MEASURES.

11.10.7          Planning applications for all retail developments will be considered having regard to the above. Proposals must not conflict with adjacent / nearby land uses and must respect the setting, character and quality of the local environment, particularly in terms of their general massing and use of materials. Particular care and attention to good design will be required in conservation areas. On more peripheral sites, or where retail warehousing is being developed, less traditional designs may be acceptable.

11.10.8          The Government and the District Council are committed to sustaining and enhancing the vitality and viability of town centres where competing businesses facilitate competition from which consumers benefit. Such centres, because they are accessible by all modes of transport, provide a focus for the community and enable multi-purpose trips to be made. Any new proposal for retail development will, therefore, need to be considered in this context and should not, when considered in isolation or cumulatively, detrimentally affect the vitality or viability of established centres. They should also not prejudice the development of a retail proposal on a site more suitable for such uses, i.e. in terms of safeguarding the vitality and viability of a shopping centre.

11.10.9          A number of major industrial concerns are located immediately outside defined shopping centres. These concerns are important to the economic prosperity of the District and their continued industrial use will be more beneficial in terms of jobs than any retail development is likely to be. The District Council will resist the conversion of such premises to retail use. New retail proposals relating to land or premises which are either in use or have been previously used for employment purposes will only be acceptable where they comply with the criteria laid down in Policy E4 of the Plan.

11.10.10        New retail facilities should be designed with consideration for the safety / security and needs of all people, including the disabled, elderly and families with young children. Where appropriate, they should include access and facilities for disabled and elderly people, creches, children's play areas and baby changing facilities. The provision of such facilities will increase the attraction of retail schemes and enhance their vitality/ viability.

11.10.11        Hot food shops, cafes / restaurants, public houses, etc., in particular, can give rise to a great many problems, including noise, smells, litter, disturbance caused by the slamming of car doors, manoeuvring of vehicles and the arrival and departure of customers. Short term on street parking associated with these uses can cause congestion and safety hazards. Where a proposal for such a use could have a detrimental effect on the amenity of nearby occupiers, the District Council will seek to overcome problems by applying conditions, to any planning permission, regarding hours of opening, installation of sound proofing and ventilation with fume extraction equipment.

R8      

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR COMMUNITY, LEISURE, OFFICE AND RESIDENTIAL USES AS ELEMENTS OF RETAIL DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS.

11.10.12        In traditional shopping centres, shopping is mixed with a number of other community, leisure and business uses. Shopping trips are often combined with other activities. The development of major new shopping centres should reflect this diversity. The inclusion of community and leisure facilities in particular can help to keep shopping centres alive during the evenings. The incorporation of office floorspace in retail schemes can provide a much needed addition to the stock of small offices in the District.

R9      

WHERE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS WOULD INVOLVE THE DEMOLITION OF PREMISES OCCUPIED BY SMALL RETAIL OUTLETS OR SPECIALIST BUSINESSES OR WOULD OTHERWISE SERIOUSLY PREJUDICE THE CONTINUED USE OF SUCH PREMISES FOR THIS PURPOSE, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED UNLESS SUITABLE ALTERNATIVE ACCOMMODATION FOR SUCH OUTLETS AND / OR BUSINESSES WOULD BE PROVIDED IN THE VICINITY.

11.10.13        In the past the development of new shopping schemes has often resulted in the demolition of older, low rental retail premises. These types of premises have traditionally provided accommodation for local retailers and specialist businesses. If centres are to attract more visitors, such shops, which provide variety to the national multiples found in most retail centres, are vital. In this context, small retailers/ specialist businesses means those businesses occupying premises with a gross floorspace of less than 100sq metres. Such businesses make an important contribution to the local economy and therefore need to be located in areas where most people do their shopping. Small retailers and specialist businesses can be harmed by redevelopment schemes and their relocation in the same general area as opposed to extinction is often in the best interests of the community. Developers could meet the requirements of this policy in various ways, such as providing new floorspace for displaced businesses or demonstrating that there are suitable alternative premises elsewhere in the locality.

11.11  Individual Shops

11.11.1          To complement the policy of concentrating retail development into existing and proposed centres, new shopping development outside of these centres will be strictly controlled to those serving the immediately adjoining areas.

R10    

WHERE REQUIRED, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE EXTENSION OF EXISTING SHOP PREMISES PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE APPEARANCE AND AMENITY OF THE AREA;

2)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER, QUALITY AND AMENITY OF THE SURROUNDING AREA;

3)        NOT LEAD TO THE OVER INTENSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE.

11.11.2          Whilst the Local Plan seeks to channel new shopping development into defined centres, it is recognised that many existing small individual shops will have a continuing role to play. Some scope for the limited extension of these premises will be allowed, subject to the application of criteria outlined above.

11.12  Factory and Farm Shops

11.12.1          The loss of industrial land and premises to retail uses will not normally be permitted unless there are exceptional circumstances for so doing. However, one exception to retail activity on employment sites relates to the provision of factory shops where a small part of a building is used for selling of goods manufactured either on the premises or elsewhere by the same company.

R11    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF FACTORY SHOPS, WITHIN THE CURTILAGE OF EXISTING FACTORIES, PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THE PRODUCTS TO BE SOLD ARE MANUFACTURED BY THE ORGANISATION WHO OCCUPIES THE FACTORY;

2)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE VITALITY OR VIABILITY OF EXISTING SHOPPING CENTRES.

11.12.2          Over recent years there has been a growth in the number of factory shops, particularly in the textile industry selling products which are slightly imperfect or surplus stock. In most cases these uses do not compete with or generally affect the viability of existing shopping centres. Provided that such uses are limited to selling goods manufactured by the company in question, they do not compete with existing centres and adequate car parking is provided, they will generally be acceptable. The Council will either impose conditions or negotiate a Section 106 Agreement to control subsequent occupation.

R12    

WHERE REQUIRED, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF RETAIL OUTLETS ASSOCIATED WITH ESTABLISHED FARM HOLDINGS PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THEY PRIMARILY SELL AGRICULTURAL / HORTICULTURAL PRODUCE GROWN ON THE FARM HOLDING;

2)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE VITALITY OR VIABILITY OF EXISTING SHOPPING CENTRES.

11.12.3          The development of farm shops will generally be accepted as forming a part of farm diversification, provided that they meet the criteria outlined above.

11.13  Retail Proposals

R13    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF RETAIL AND ASSOCIATED USES ON 1.6 HECTARES OF LAND ADJACENT TO THE OAK TREE DISTRICT CENTRE.

11.13.1          The District Council has identified a site adjacent to the Oak Tree District Centre which it considers appropriate for the extension of retail and other facilities. Any development must have regard to leisure facilities at the Centre and include provision for relocation of the all-weather sports pitch. It will also need to maintain pedestrian links through adjoining open space areas and provide any additional parking / service requirements.

11.13.2          Developments considered to be acceptable in strengthening the role of the above District Centre would include retail, office, residential, community and leisure uses appropriate to District Centres, e.g. public houses, health centres and indoor sports facilities. The District Council will encourage the implementation of environmental improvements, including landscaping, traffic management, and parking / servicing. Improved access to the District Centre will be sought, particularly with respect to public transport proposals and pedestrian / cycle routes.

11.14  Optional Retail Proposals

11.14.1          The Local Plan identifies a number of sites which the District Council considers appropriate for certain, specific, retail uses as alternatives to other developments.

R14    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLE RETAIL OPERATIONS, INCLUDING PETROL FILLING STATIONS, AS ALTERNATIVES TO OTHER LAND USE OPTIONS ON 1.2 HECTARES OF LAND OFF NOTTINGHAM ROAD.

11.14.2          This site was previously used as a car showroom with associated activities. The District Council considers this to be the only form of retail use appropriate to the site. Other acceptable uses include employment or leisure.

R15    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESTAURANT/PUBLIC HOUSE, AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO OTHER LAND USE OPTIONS, AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:-

R15(A)           1.7 HECTARES OF LAND AT RUSHPOOL FARM.

11.14.3          Development of housing between Old and New Mill Lane may lead to the redundancy of the Rushpool Farm Buildings. These would be considered appropriate for conversion and re-use as a restaurant / public house. Acceptable alternative uses for the buildings include a hotel or residential development.

R15(B)           0.4 HECTARES OF LAND OFF WOODHOUSE ROAD.

11.14.4          The Queen Elizabeth Girls School recently re-located. The site comprises the oldest part of the former school site and includes a listed building which should be retained in any proposals for the site. The building has an extremely attractive setting and offers the potential for re-use as a restaurant / public house. Other acceptable uses include offices, hotel or non-residential institution.

R16     PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESTAURANT, PUBLIC HOUSE AND/OR MOTOR VEHICLE RELATED RETAIL OPERATIONS, INCLUDING PETROL FILLING STATIONS, AS ALTERNATIVES TO OTHER LAND USE OPTIONS, AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:-

R16(A)           0.6 HECTARES OF LAND OFF SUTTON ROAD.

11.14.5          This vacant site has a prime frontage location on the main A38 road into Mansfield. It is considered appropriate for the development of a restaurant/public house or motor vehicle related operations, i.e. petrol filling station/car wash. A high standard of design would be expected, considering its important location. Other acceptable development would include employment uses, hotel or leisure.

R16(B)           0.9 HECTARES OF LAND OFF DEBDALE LANE.

11.14.6          This prime site, with frontage on a busy route between Mansfield and Mansfield Woodhouse is close to the Mansfield Woodhouse railway station. It is considered appropriate for development of a restaurant / public house and / or motor vehicle related operations i.e. petrol filling station /car wash / vehicle showroom /car hire. Other acceptable uses would include employment uses or hotel.

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This page was last modified 12/09/2008 09:28:52

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