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Written Statement - Chapter 10 - Derelict Land, Waste and Minerals

10.1    Introduction

10.1.1 Many of the District's traditional industries, particularly coal mining and quarrying, whilst bringing economic benefits to the area, can leave a legacy of derelict and despoiled land. Unrestored or poorly restored workings have a depressive effect on the environment, create a poor image for the District and can act as a disincentive to investment. They also represent a wasted land resource.

10.1.2 Nottinghamshire County Council, as Mineral Planning Authority and Waste Planning Authority, prepares Minerals and Waste Local Plans, as well as making decisions on planning applications relating to such matters. The District Council is consulted on these issues. The District Council is the Planning Policy Authority with responsibilities for making decisions on planning applications and the preparation of Local Plan policies relating to other matters.

10.2    Objectives

10.2.1 The improvement of derelict and despoiled sites to bring them into beneficial use.

10.2.2 Secure the full and proper restoration of past and present mineral workings.

10.2.3 Identify and encourage appropriate after uses for restored land.

10.2.4 Ensure close liaison with the Minerals Planning Authority, and make them fully aware of all economic, social and environmental issues, in their consideration of relevant mineral operations in the District.

10.2.5 Discourage new large-scale mineral workings, including extensions to existing operations, unless they bring clear benefits to the District.

10.3    Derelict Land

DWM1           

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS TO RECLAIM SITES AND BRING THEM INTO APPROPRIATE BENEFICIAL USE, ON LAND THAT MAY BE DERELICT, DESPOILED OR CONTAMINATED, PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        HAVE REGARD TO GROUND CONDITIONS AND WHERE APPROPRIATE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR REMEDIAL TREATMENT;

2)        UNDERTAKE ANY NECESSARY REMEDIAL TREATMENT PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OR OCCUPATION;

3)        NOT CAUSE, OR LEAD TO AN INCREASED, POLLUTION THREAT TO NEARBY LAND OR WATERCOURSES;

4)        HAVE REGARD TO ANY WILDLIFE AND/OR GEOLOGICAL ISSUES RELATIVE TO THE SITE.

10.3.1 The decline of many traditional industries in the District has left a legacy of vacant derelict land. Such damaged landscapes and redundant sites, however, present a major opportunity for new developments, environmental improvement and regeneration. Whilst many sites have been reclaimed or will be dealt with through planning conditions, there are a number of land uses/developments throughout the District which pre-date effective planning control or are subject to inadequate conditions which cannot achieve an adequate standard of restoration. The District Council will, in co-operation with the County Council, the private sector and other agencies, seek to bring about restoration schemes and appropriate beneficial after uses.

10.3.2 The development of derelict, despoiled and contaminated land can lead to the remobilisation of contaminants and also greatly increase the volumes of pollutants which could discharge to previously clean land and ground waters. Such sites should be thoroughly investigated and applicants are encouraged to discuss development proposals on land, that is likely to have problems relating to the above, with the District Council and/or other relevant bodies.

10.3.3 In some cases it may be possible for the reclamation of materials to take place as part of the process of redevelopment of derelict sites. This would clearly accord with the objectives of government policy to encourage the use of secondary materials in construction. Such schemes will, therefore, be supported providing they would not lead to further pollution, cause harm to wildlife or have an adverse impact on the amenity of occupiers of adjacent land.

10.3.4 Derelict and vacant sites can often support features of wildlife and geological value which should be taken into account when considering development proposals. Often such interests can be maintained and enhanced through redevelopment.

10.4    Waste

10.4.1 Disposal of the District's waste used to be dealt with by the Hermitage Lane incineration plant. Since its closure however, in 1992, Mansfield's waste is being disposed of at Sutton and Bilsthorpe landfills. There are only two active waste disposal sites in the District, at Berry Hill and Vale Road, Mansfield Woodhouse, which accepts inert construction waste. Clinical waste is no longer incinerated at Kings Mill Hospital although it does still accept it and has it removed from the site. There are waste transfer stations at Mansfield Woodhouse, Bleak Hills and Warsop. Household waste and recycling centres (or civic amenity sites) are located at Hermitage Lane, Mansfield and Oakfield Lane, Warsop.

10.4.2 The Deposit Draft of the Waste Local Plan for the County was published in October, 1997. This gives guidance on the disposal of domestic, industrial and commercial waste produced in the District. The Nottinghamshire Structure Plan provides the strategic framework for all Local Plans in the County with considerable emphasis on protecting the public, the environment and the restoration of despoiled land. The Environment Agency, which includes the former Waste Regulation Authority and the National Rivers Authority, has an interest in waste disposal issues, particularly in relation to its Groundwater Protection Policy.

10.5    Minerals Workings

10.5.1 The District Council will liaise with the Minerals Planning Authority on matters relating to mineral operations within and near to its area. The Minerals Local Plan was adopted by Nottinghamshire County Council in November 1997. As Mineral Planning Authority, the County Council has responsibility for determining minerals planning applications. The District Council is consulted and, therefore, comments on all such applications relating to sites within or near to its area. The District Council will seek to ensure that any new proposals for mineral related operations, including extensions to existing works within or near to the District's area would:-

- not have an adverse impact on the amenity of nearby residential areas;- respect the existing landscape character;- consider the potential impact on the natural and historic environment;- consider the potential impact of all operational requirements, particularly transportation.

10.6    Coal

10.6.1 There are no longer any working collieries within the District. The legacy of former collieries, i.e. Mansfield, Warsop and Sherwood with their tips, together with ongoing tipping at nearby collieries, i.e. Clipstone, Rufford, Shirebrook and Welbeck, is a major issue of concern. The Council will, in association with the County Council as Minerals Planning Authority, seek to ensure the satisfactory restoration of former colliery sites and tips to bring them into appropriate beneficial uses. Policies elsewhere in this Local Plan include proposals for future uses on former Colliery sites, including recreational uses of the tipping areas.

10.6.2 The Coal Measures 'outcrop' (exposed coalfield), encroaches into the western part of Mansfield District. The District Council supports the Minerals Planning Authority's policies on resisting the opencasting of coal in the Teversal/Skegby Dawgates landscape area as shown on Plan 5.

10.7    Sandstone

10.7.1 Two major sand quarries exist in the District at Ratcher Hill, off Southwell Road and at Berry Hill, off King George V Avenue. Both are long established with major reserves. Ratcher Hill Quarry is expected to continue to be worked during the Plan period. Extensions to the workings at this quarry will be resisted by the District Council due to environmental considerations. Berry Hill Quarry is nearing the end of its useful life and part of the site will be available for development within the later part of the Plan period.

10.7.2 Gregory Quarry, off Nottingham Road, provides the only building stone, quarried in the County and is the only quarry producing magnesium sandstone nationally. 'Mansfield White' is the stone which is currently worked at Gregory Quarry and was used to build the Town Halls of Newark and Mansfield. It is especially well seen at Southwell Minster. English Heritage currently use the stone for major repairs at Bolsover Castle as it has proved to be the best available Dolomitic Sandstone. It is estimated that there are sufficient reserves to last seventy years, at recent extraction rates. Policy 9/2 of the Nottinghamshire Structure Plan Review, establishes the principle of avoiding the unnecessary sterilisation of important mineral resources. The Nottinghamshire Minerals Local Plan also makes reference to issues of mineral resource sterilisation. Having regard to the above the District Council will liaise with the Minerals Planning Authority to ensure that Gregory Quarry is in no way sterilised through development.

10.8    Limestone

10.8.1 The most significant limestone related workings within the District are located at Vale Road, Mansfield Woodhouse. There are a number of major problems relating to the current status of the two quarries at this location, e.g. access, disturbance to nearby residents and safety. The District Council will continue to liaise with the County Council, in their capacity as both Minerals and Waste Planning Authority, to identify appropriate after uses and acceptable means of achieving them. The District Council considers that a recreational use would be worthy of further investigation, e.g. as a water based facility.

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This page was last modified 12/09/2008 09:28:45

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