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Written Statement - Chapter 04a - Environment

4.1      Introduction

4.1.1   Public awareness of environmental issues has increased markedly in recent years. There is now widespread concern about the quality of the urban environment and countryside and about the need to reduce the use of scarce natural resources. The District Council has, along with others, a responsibility for the care of the environment and is currently undertaking a range of initiatives to improve it. This Local Plan can only reflect those initiatives which have land use implications and this chapter includes policies covering the built and natural environment.

4.1.2   Recent legislation, circulars and Government advice such as the UK Biodiversity Action Plan have introduced the concept of sustainability into the planning process. This seeks to achieve a balance between economic growth, technological development and environmental considerations. Sustainable development is development which does not exceed levels or take forms that cannot be sustained without detriment to key environmental assets, capacities or thresholds. As stated in PPG 15, concepts of sustainability have particular relevance to the preservation of the historic environment, which by its nature is irreplaceable, as well as the preservation of the natural environment. The Government's White Paper 'This Common Inheritance' recognises that economic growth has to respect the environment as well as being soundly based. Thus in meeting the District's undoubted economic development requirements the future well being of Mansfield's environment should not be prejudiced nor sacrificed for short term gains.

BUILT ENVIRONMENT

4.2      Background

4.2.1   Mansfield District contains a surprisingly rich diversity of historic buildings, structures and archaeological remains. This heritage provides a sense of continuity and historic development which contributes greatly to Mansfield's attractiveness as a place to work, live and visit.

4.2.2   Buildings, civic structures and monuments are part of Mansfield's heritage, adding historic interest and a unique character to the District's urban area and countryside.

4.2.3   Local economic development is essential if Mansfield's community is to thrive. However the historic character provided by past development phases in the District and within its settlements is vitally important. Great care must be taken to preserve townscapes, buildings, civic structures, spaces and views which contribute to this character and to the District's sense of history and place. Further change and development will contribute to the District's future history.

4.2.4   The District Council attaches great importance to the enhancement of the built environment, both as an end in itself and as a means to encourage regeneration and investment in Mansfield. The Council can seek to achieve this through:-

- its statutory role and influence as planning authority;- its responsibilities as landowner and developer;- the undertaking of improvement projects, either on its own or with other agencies;- awarding grants (e.g., Town Schemes, Facelift) for improvement and refurbishment schemes;- affording additional protection to areas (e.g., conservation areas) or buildings (e.g., building preservation notices).

4.3      Objectives

4.3.1   Enhance the quality of Mansfield's built environment.

4.3.2   Ensure new developments, including alterations and extensions, are designed sensitively and to a high standard, using appropriate materials.

4.3.3   Protect and enhance buildings of architectural or historic interest and their settings, ancient monuments and archaeological features.

4.3.4   Protect and enhance conservation areas and other areas of special character.

4.3.5   Secure improvements to those areas with a poorer quality environment.

4.3.6   Encourage the effective use of hard and soft landscaping to enhance the built environment

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

4.4      New Development

4.4.1   The District Council attaches great importance to a high standard of visual appearance for all development. This applies to all areas but is of particular significance in those areas of historic, architectural or landscape value.

BE1    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WHICH ACHIEVE A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN PROVIDED THEY MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THE SCALE, DENSITY, MASSING, HEIGHT, LAYOUT AND ACCESS RELATE WELL TO NEIGHBOURING BUILDINGS AND THE LOCAL AREA GENERALLY;

2)        THE MATERIALS USED ARE IN KEEPING WITH THE SITE'S SURROUNDINGS;

3)        THE LEVEL OF HARD AND SOFT LANDSCAPING IS CONSISTENT WITH THE TYPE AND DESIGN OF THE DEVELOPMENT AND ITS SETTING;

4)        THE PROPOSAL INTEGRATES EXISTING LANDSCAPE AND NATURE CONSERVATION FEATURES.

4.4.2   The Council will execute its development control and other responsibilities in a firm and positive way to achieve a high standard of development and design which complements the existing character of the District and allows for new design solutions where appropriate.

4.4.3   Development proposals of all kinds can benefit from a well designed setting, incorporating hard and soft landscaping. The wider environment can also benefit from the incorporation of existing features within the development proposals such as trees, walls, paving etc.

4.4.4   The District Council will encourage developers to have discussions with the Police Architectural Liaison Officer to try to ensure that new developments of all types will create secure environments which lessen the risk of crime.

4.5      Listed Buildings

4.5.1   There are presently 243 buildings listed as being of special architectural or historic interest within the District (details outlined in Appendix 2a). These buildings represent the best of this country's heritage and they form an important part of the local urban fabric.

BE2    

PLANNING AND RELATED APPLICATIONS FOR LISTED BUILDING CONSENT WILL NOT BE GRANTED    FOR DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS WHICH INVOLVE DEMOLITION OF A LISTED BUILDING OTHER THAN IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES. APPLICATIONS WILL BE JUDGED AGAINST THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THE IMPORTANCE OF THE BUILDING, ITS INTRINSIC ARCHITECTURAL AND HISTORIC INTEREST AND RARITY, IN BOTH NATIONAL AND LOCAL TERMS;

2)        THE PARTICULAR PHYSICAL FEATURES OF THE BUILDING WHICH JUSTIFY ITS INCLUSION ON THE STATUTORY OR LOCAL LISTS;

3)        THE BUILDING'S SETTING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO THE LOCAL SCENE;

4)        THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE PROPOSED WORKS WILL BRING SUBSTANTIAL BENEFITS TO THE COMMUNITY, IN PARTICULAR BY CONTRIBUTING TO THE ECONOMIC REGENERATION OF THE AREA OR THE ENHANCEMENT OF ITS ENVIRONMENT.

4.5.2   Demolition of a listed building is seldom justified and Government advice in Circular 8/87 indicates that there is a presumption in favour of preserving listed buildings. The District Council will not, therefore, be prepared to grant consent unless every effort has been made to continue the current use or to find a suitable alternative use. Evidence should be provided that the building has been offered for sale on the open market, as should details of the condition of the building. Permission is required from the District Council's Building Control Services for the demolition of any building in the District. When the local authority is considering an application for listed building consent, it does not have a statutory duty to have regard to the development plan, unlike the duty that is placed on it when dealing with applications for planning permission. Nevertheless, the Local Authority does have a statutory duty to have a special regard to the desirability of preserving any listed building or its setting, or any features of special architectural or historic interest which the listed buildings possess. Policies relating to listed buildings need to be included in local plans as there is often a close link between considerations relating to applications for listed building consent and to planning applications, the local plan is the correct place in which to specify the approach that the authority will take when dealing with such applications.

BE3    

LISTED BUILDING CONSENT AND/OR PLANNING PERMISSION WILL ONLY BE GRANTED FOR ALTERATIONS/ADDITIONS/CHANGES OF USE OF A LISTED BUILDING OR STRUCTURE WHERE THIS WOULD NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT ITS CHARACTER, ITS ARCHITECTURAL MERIT OR HISTORICAL INTEREST.

4.5.3   The alteration or extension of listed buildings requires skill and care in order to preserve the architectural or historic character of the building. Depending on the nature of any alterations, planning permission may be required as well as listed building consent. Any internal or external alterations should be in keeping with other parts of the building and should harmonise with the buildings surroundings. The District Council administers various grant schemes in certain areas to help owners meet the additional costs which may arise with repairs to listed buildings because of the need to restore particular detailing or to use specialist materials or skills. This policy is intended to apply in cases when, any proposals, which require both listed building consent and planning permission, have the potential to have an impact on the character of a listed building. This will also apply in cases where proposals require only listed building consent.

BE4    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WHICH WOULD HAVE AN ADVERSE IMPACT ON THE SETTING OF A LISTED BUILDING. APPLICATIONS WILL BE JUDGED AGAINST THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        WHETHER THE SETTING OF THE LISTED BUILDING WOULD BE PRESERVED OR ENHANCED;

2)        WHETHER THE DESIGN OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE IN KEEPING WITH THE SETTING OF THE LISTED BUILDING;

3)        WHETHER EXISTING LANDSCAPE FEATURES WHICH CONTRIBUTE TO THE SETTING OF THE BUILDING WOULD BE RETAINED OR ENHANCED;

4.5.4   The setting of a listed building is often an integral part of its character and value which development may alter. The District Council will therefore, carefully consider the effect that proposed developments may have on the setting of listed buildings and will closely monitor the use of adjoining premises and land. It will also seek to enhance their setting by appropriate measures such as the control of design, traffic, tree planting and the preservation of existing trees and other landscape features. When planning applications are made, the applicant will be expected to provide detailed evidence that they satisfy all of the policy criteria.

BE5    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WHICH WOULD INVOLVE THE BENEFICIAL RE-USE OF LISTED BUILDINGS.

4.5.5   The continued use of a listed building is the most positive means of securing its adequate maintenance and ensuring its long term future. The best use for a listed building is that for which it was designed and wherever possible the original use should continue or be resumed. This policy is directed at ensuring that buildings are not neglected because the owners cannot find a use for them. However, changes of use which would have a detrimental effect on the appearance and character of the listed building will not be permitted.

4.6      Conservation Areas

4.6.1   There are now ten conservation areas within the District (listed in Appendix 2b);-

            Bridge Street (Mansfield town centre)

            Market Place (Mansfield town centre)

            West Gate (Mansfield town centre)

            The Park (Mansfield)         

            Nottingham Road (Mansfield)

            Crow Hill Drive (Mansfield)

            Mansfield Woodhouse centre

            Pleasley Vale

            Market Warsop centre

            Church Warsop

4.6.2   The Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act, 1990, places a duty on local authorities to review existing conservation areas and to consider the designation of new ones. As part of the preparation of the Plan the Council has reviewed the conservation areas within the District. This has resulted in the declaration of four new conservation areas at Nottingham Road, Crow Hill Drive, Church Warsop and Market Warsop. These were declared by the District Council in September, 1994.

The boundaries of the existing conservation areas were also reviewed at the same time and extensions were made to the Bridge Street Conservation Area (Midworth and Dame Flogan Streets), Market Place Conservation Area (Leeming Street) and West Gate Conservation Area (St John Street and Wood Street).

BE6

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN CONSERVATION AREAS PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        RESPECT THE SPECIAL CHARACTER OF THE CONSERVATION AREA;

2)        BE DESIGNED TO RESPECT AND INTEGRATE WITH THE SURROUNDINGS. PARTICULAR ATTENTION SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE MASS, FORM AND SCALE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ITS IMPACT ON THE SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT;

3)        USE MATERIALS WHICH ARE OF GOOD QUALITY, AND REFLECT THE DESIGN OF THE BUILDING(S) AS A WHOLE.INFILL DEVELOPMENTS SHOULD USE MATERIALS WHICH ARE SYMPATHETIC TO THEIR SURROUNDINGS AND WHICH COMPLEMENT MATERIALS USED IN ADJACENT AND PROMINENT BUILDINGS IN THE STREET SCENE. EXTENSIONS TO OR ALTERATIONS TO BUILDINGS SHOULD USE MATERIALS WHICH MATCH OR ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE ORIGINAL BUILDING;

4)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OR AMENITY OF THE SURROUNDING AREA BY WAY OF VISUAL IMPACT, NOISE, TRAFFIC GENERATION OR OTHER FACTORS;

5)        NOT SPOIL OR DESTROY ATTRACTIVE VIEWS AND VISTAS INTO, WITHIN OR OUT OF THE CONSERVATION AREA WHERE THESE ARE IMPORTANT TO THE CHARACTER OF THE AREA.

4.6.3   The District Council is anxious to ensure that new development or any alteration in a conservation area is well designed and respects the character of the area. Particular attention will need to be given to the scale, form and detailing of proposals as outlined in PPG 15. For these reasons it is not usually appropriate to consider applications for development in outline form only.

4.6.4   Conservation area designation is not a mechanism for prohibiting change, but rather it ensures that change is carried out sensitively and in a manner sympathetic to the character of the area. The District Council is committed to ensuring that development within conservation areas is to the benefit of the local environment. It will use its development control and other powers in a firm but positive way to ensure a high standard of design and development in all conservation areas.

BE7    

PLANNING PERMISSION AND RELATED APPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION AREA CONSENT WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS WHICH INVOLVE DEMOLITION IN CONSERVATION AREAS OTHER THAN IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES. APPLICATIONS WILL BE JUDGED AGAINST THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        THE PART PLAYED BY THE BUILDING IN THE ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST OF THE AREA;

2)        THE CONDITION OF THE BUILDING AND THE VIABILITY OF ITS RETENTION AND CONTINUED OCCUPATION;

3)        THE WIDER EFFECTS OF DEMOLITION ON THE SURROUNDINGS AND ON THE CONSERVATION AREA AS A WHOLE;

4)        WHETHER THE REPLACEMENT SCHEME WILL MAKE A POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION TO THE APPEARANCE OR CHARACTER OF THE AREA OR BRING OTHER SUBSTANTIAL BENEFITS TO THE COMMUNITY THAT OUTWEIGH THE HARM CAUSED BY THE LOSS OF THE BUILDINGS. IN SUCH CASES, CONSENT WILL ONLY BE GRANTED WHERE THERE ARE ACCEPTABLE DETAILED PROPOSALS FOR THE REDEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE.

4.6.5   When the Local Authority is considering an application for conservation area consent it does not have a statutory duty to have regard to the development plan, unlike the duty that is placed on it when dealing with applications for planning permission. Nevertheless the local authority does have regard to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of any conservation area in exercising their development control functions (Planning, Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas Act 1990 s72(1)). It is the view of the District Council that, although it does not have a statutory duty to have regard to this Plan when considering applications for conservation consent, conservation policies should be included in development plans as there is often a close link between considerations relating to applications for conservation area consent and planning permission.

4.6.6   This policy is also designed to prevent the appearance of unsightly gaps in conservation areas following premature demolition. Therefore even when a case for demolition has been made, consent will only normally be given where there are acceptable and detailed plans for redevelopment.

4.6.7   The cumulative effect of minor alterations to some residential buildings in conservation areas can lead to a dramatic erosion of character in historic areas and the District Council will consider the use of Article 4 Directions to control 'permitted development' rights where necessary.

BE8    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS ADJACENT TO CONSERVATION AREAS IF THEY WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE CHARACTER OR APPEARANCE OF THE CONSERVATION AREA.

4.6.8   Development of land and buildings adjoining conservation areas can often have a significant impact on the character of these areas. This policy is aimed at ensuring the proper consideration of such factors in the development process.

BE9    

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WHICH WOULD LEAD TO THE REMOVAL OF FEATURES IN CONSERVATION AREAS SUCH AS WALLS, TREES, HEDGES, OPEN SPACES AND FENCES WHERE SUCH FEATURES CONTRIBUTE TOWARDS THE CHARACTER OF THE AREA.

4.6.9   The character of conservation areas can often be due as much to the existence of trees, walls, fences, open spaces etc. as the buildings themselves. Therefore the District Council will seek to retain such features where their existence contributes to the character of the area.

BE10 

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS THAT WOULD ENABLE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS IN CONSERVATION AREAS.

4.6.10 The District Council will in association with landowners and other interested parties, seek to improve the appearance of conservation areas by appropriate environmental improvement schemes. Improvements could include repaving, tree planting and the provision of street furniture.

4.7      Town Centre Conservation Areas

4.7.1   There is no single building style predominant in Mansfield's town centre conservation areas. Many of the oldest buildings are constructed of Mansfield stone with British slate or clay pantile roofs. In other areas nineteenth and early twentieth century brick buildings predominate. The different styles all contribute to Mansfield's character and are indicative of the town's dynamic past. In recognition of the many historic listed buildings in Mansfield centre, three conservation areas have been declared, centred around the Market Place, Bridge Street and upper Westgate. Future developments should respect and grow out of this character and maintain or improve upon the existing situation by the use of sympathetic design and where appropriate, traditional materials such as British slate, brick, clay pantiles and locally quarried sandstone or limestone.

4.7.2   Attention will be paid to how proposed developments, whether within or on the edge of the conservation area, affect important views, streetscapes and skylines.

4.8      The Park

4.8.1   The Park and Park Avenue have a unique character. Large detached Victorian houses stand in extensive grounds along tree lined streets, beside impressive terraced and semi-detached houses. Many houses are built from local Mansfield stone, with others built from red brick. Most have slate roofs. A notable feature of the area is the presence of stone walls, in particular along Windmill Lane. The fields running down from Windmill Lane to the River Maun give an open aspect to the area and extend the countryside to within half a mile of the town centre. Carr Bank Park is one of Mansfield's formal parks and forms an attractive setting for the listed Carr Bank House.

4.8.2   Special attention will be paid to materials when new development is proposed. Traditional building materials such as Mansfield stone, Midland Imperial red bricks and British slate will usually be required. Traditional design and detailing of windows, doors, gables, eaves and roofs will be encouraged for all new developments. Similar criteria will be used when considering appropriate boundary treatments.

4.8.3   Development affecting trees, important open spaces and views, particularly in respect of the open countryside and Carr Bank Park, will be given particularly careful consideration.

4.9      Nottingham Road (Mansfield)

4.9.1   The area contains important groups of listed buildings. There are two important churches together with their associated almshouses. A very significant late Victorian terrace fronts Nottingham Road and gives the area its character. Originally built as large town houses, these now contain offices. All of these buildings are finely detailed and, in the main, are constructed from locally quarried stone, together with British slate roofs. This area is located along an important gateway into Mansfield. Conservation area status protects this significant collection of substantial and historically important buildings adjacent to Titchfield Park. Future developments should respect and reflect this character and maintain or improve upon the existing situation by the use of sympathetic design and, where appropriate, traditional materials such as British slate, brick, clay pantiles and locally quarried sandstone or limestone.

4.10    Crow Hill (Mansfield)

4.10.1 This area has an open character with large finely detailed Victorian homes constructed from stone and brick, which stand in attractive grounds with many trees. Stone walls are a prominent feature. The former Queen Elizabeth's Girls school and grounds also contribute to the area's character. Stone Cross Lane has a distinctive character and is bounded by stone walls, trees and open spaces. Its narrowness and lack of kerbs lends it a semi-rural appearance. Future developments should respect and reflect this character and maintain or improve upon the existing situation by the use of sympathetic design and where appropriate traditional materials such as British slate, brick, clay pantiles and locally quarried sandstone or limestone.

4.11    Mansfield Woodhouse

4.11.1 Historic Woodhouse is centred on the High Street, Station Street and Church Street. It contains many fine vernacular buildings constructed in local Woodhouse stone. Some are in residential and some in commercial use. The village is recognised as one of the finest stone built centres in Nottinghamshire. There are attractive court developments and open spaces often enclosed by stone walls. It is this layout of contrasting enclosure and open spaces as well as the design and materials of the buildings that give this part of Woodhouse its character. Unfortunately many of the individual and groups of buildings are in need of renovation and repair. For this reason Conservation Area Partnership and Facelift Grant Schemes have been approved for the financial years 1995-98. Mansfield Woodhouse conservation area has great potential for enhancement. Close attention will be paid to planned new developments which will be expected to make use of local traditional building materials such as Mansfield Woodhouse limestone or Mansfield sandstone, British slate and clay pantiles. Local traditional design and detailing of windows, doors, gables, eaves and roofs will also be encouraged. Similar criteria will be used when considering appropriate boundary treatments.

4.11.2 The use of rough cast reconstituted stone will not usually be acceptable. The use of smooth (Ashlar) recast stone, which matches the local stone in colour and texture may be considered in particular circumstances.

4.12    Pleasley Vale

4.12.1 The area contained within the conservation area has a specific topographical character of woods, open spaces and rock outcrops, which is closely associated with the Pleasley Mills complex and its estate houses and village buildings which include a fine church. All of these features are set in the valley of the River Meden.

4.12.2 Any new development within the Vale will be required to use local traditional building materials including Mansfield Woodhouse limestone or Mansfield sandstone, British slate and clay pantiles. Local traditional design and detailing of the windows, doors, gables, eaves and roofs will also be encouraged. Similar criteria will be used when considering appropriate boundary treatments.

4.13    Market Warsop

4.13.1 This settlement's medieval layout is still clearly identifiable. There are a number of buildings of late 17th Century and 18th Century which testify to a considerable period of rebuilding in the village during that period. Many still retain their long narrow plots. The village is full of character with its own distinctive feel. Future developments should respect and reflect this character and maintain or improve upon the existing situation by the use of sympathetic design and, where appropriate, traditional materials such as British slate, brick, clay pantiles and locally quarried sandstone or limestone.

4.14    Church Warsop

4.14.1 Church Warsop is a fine settlement of stone houses and farms centred on the church of St Peter and St Paul, parts of which date back to the 14th century. Included within the conservation area are the remains of a mill and mill pond on the edge of an attractive open park, known as 'The Carrs'. Moorfield and Manor Farms are included, together with their surrounding stone barns and outbuildings. Close attention will be paid to planned new developments which will be expected to make use of local traditional building materials such as Mansfield Woodhouse limestone or Mansfield sandstone, British slate and clay pantiles. Local traditional design and detailing of windows, doors, gables, eaves and roofs will also be encouraged. Similar criteria will be used when considering appropriate boundary treatments.

4.15    Sites of Archaeological Importance

4.15.1 The history of human settlement in the District has left a legacy of sites of archaeological importance. The most significant of these are formally scheduled as ancient monuments and there are currently four of these in the District. In addition to these sites there are numerous others of more local importance. Government advice in PPG 16 'Archaeology and Planning' states that such remains are part of our essential national identity and are valuable both for their own sake and for their role in education, leisure and tourism.

BE11 

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS WHICH WOULD DAMAGE OR ADVERSELY AFFECT SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENTS AND THEIR SETTINGS.

4.15.2 Where nationally important archaeological remains, whether scheduled or not, and their setting, are affected by proposed development there should be a presumption in favour of their physical preservation. There are four scheduled ancient monuments within the District as shown on the Proposals Map (further details outlined in Appendix 2c) at Kings Mill Viaduct; Roman Villa off Common Lane, Mansfield Woodhouse; Village Cross, Mansfield Woodhouse; Beeston Lodge, Mansfield Woodhouse. Such monuments have statutory protection and certain defined works which affect them require the consent of the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. The District Council will seek the preservation in situ of all nationally important archaeological remains and planning permission will not normally be granted for developments which would adversely affect them or their setting.

BE12 

WHERE PLANNING APPLICATIONS ARE SUBMITTED WHICH MAY AFFECT SITES OF KNOWN OR POSSIBLE ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST THE DISTRICT COUNCIL MAY REQUIRE AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE SITE, COMPRISING A DESKTOP EVALUATION AND, WHERE APPROPRIATE, A FIELD EVALUATION TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT AND LEVEL OF SUCH INTEREST AND THE IMPACT OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT. THE DISTRICT COUNCIL MAY ALSO REQUIRE A SCHEME OF TREATMENT FOR THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS PRIOR TO DETERMINING THE APPLICATION.

4.15.3 There are many sites of archaeological interest in the District which are not scheduled. Details of the likely archaeological potential of a site can be obtained from the County Sites and Monument Records. In considering planning applications the District Council will consider the effects of development on sites of known archaeological interest. Where development is likely to disturb or destroy remains the Council may request that an archaeological evaluation be undertaken prior to determining the planning application. Such an evaluation will normally assess the potential importance of the site and the impact of the proposed development. Where such interest does exist the Council will then determine whether it is necessary to impose any conditions with regard to archaeological treatment of the site.

BE13 

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS ON SITES OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE UNLESS THEY MAKE PROVISION FOR AN APPROPRIATE SCHEME FOR THE TREATMENT OF REMAINS. IN DETERMINING A PLANNING APPLICATION, THE COUNCIL WILL WEIGH THE IMPORTANCE OF REMAINS AGAINST THE NEED FOR DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER MATERIAL CONSIDERATIONS.

4.15.4 In the few cases where development may be acceptable on sites of archaeological significance, the District Council will prefer that the remains are preserved in-situ. Where it can be demonstrated that this is not possible and it is considered acceptable for the remains to be destroyed then detailed records will need to be made before development commences.

4.16    Shopfronts and Advertisements

4.16.1 Insensitively designed shopfronts and overbearing advertisements can have a damaging effect both on individual buildings and on the street scene in general. This can be especially true in conservation areas and with regard to listed buildings.

BE14 

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF, OR ALTERATIONS TO, SHOP FRONTS AND CONSENT GRANTED TO DISPLAY ADVERTISEMENTS ON SHOP FRONTS PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING  CRITERIA:-

1)        NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OR APPEARANCE OF THE BUILDING AND SURROUNDING AREA;

2)        HAVE REGARD TO EXISTING ARCHITECTURAL AND DECORATIVE FEATURES;

3)        HAVE REGARD TO THE SECURITY OF THE PROPERTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREA;

4)        HAVE REGARD TO ACCESSIBILITY.

4.16.2 The District Council is keen to ensure that schemes to develop/extend/refurbish shopping facilities are well designed. Schemes should ensure compatibility between shop fronts and their immediate surroundings, including the upper floors of the building within which they are to be installed. The design of advertisements should follow the same principles.

4.16.3 To avoid the later installation of roller shutters and other visually obstructive security measures, consideration needs to be given to safety in the design of any new shop fronts. The District Council has prepared guidance notes covering shopfronts and shop security issues.

BE15

CONSENT FOR POSTER ADVERTISEMENT HOARDINGS WILL BE GRANTED PROVIDED THAT THEY WOULD MEET ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:-

1)        NOT RESULT IN LOSS OF AMENITY;

2)        NOT CREATE A TRAFFIC SAFETY HAZARD;

3)        RELATE IN SCALE AND DESIGN TO THEIR SURROUNDINGS.

THE DISTRICT COUNCIL WILL NOT RENEW TEMPORARY PLANNING PERMISSIONS FOR ADVERTISEMENT HOARDINGS IF THEY DO NOT SATISFY ALL THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS. POSTER ADVERTISEMENTS ARE NOT APPROPRIATE IN CONSERVATION AREAS.

4.16.4 This policy aims to ensure that buildings, streets and open land are not disfigured by unsightly advertising. If not properly controlled large advertisement hoardings can dominate their surroundings. Where possible the Council will encourage the removal of large poster advertisements either through its development control powers or by seeking the early redevelopment of vacant sites.

4.17    Derelict Land

4.17.1 The District Council will give a high priority to the reclamation of derelict and underused land.

4.18    Environmental Improvements

4.18.1 Environmental improvements can not only help to enhance the quality of the environment but can also enhance the image of the District. This in turn can encourage more people to come into the area and can foster investment and trade. The Council has in the last few years (in association with others such as the County Council) embarked on a variety of improvements throughout the District utilising a variety of sources of finance. The Council will continue to undertake such improvements and will also encourage others to do so. Parts of the Plan area suffer from a poor quality environment ranging from small derelict sites to major areas spoiled by the coal industry.

4.18.2 The District Council will continue to promote and to initiate schemes which result in the reclamation and reuse of derelict and despoiled land. It will continue to use derelict land grant funds and other funding to secure this aim.

BE16 

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENTS THAT WOULD PREVENT IMPLEMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS WHICH AIM TO:-

1)        IMPROVE PROMINENT VACANT/DERELICT SITES;

2)        IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF THE MAIN ACCESS ROUTES INTO MANSFIELD;

3)        IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF COLLIERY SPOIL COMPLEXES.

4.18.3 There are parts of the Plan area which suffer from environmental problems of one sort or another. Industrial premises may be in close proximity to houses or derelict areas may adversely affect the appearance of an area. The colliery tipping complexes at the former collieries of Mansfield, Sherwood, Warsop and Shirebrook also present an opportunity for environmental enhancement. The District Council will use all means at its disposal to bring about a programme of improvements. This will mean encouraging private owners and other agencies to participate in the regeneration process by improving their own sites and property and encouraging the removal of uses incompatible with the local area, as well as the District Council promoting its own schemes. Many derelict/vacant sites may have wildlife interest and nature conservation opportunities.

4.19    Environmental Assessment

4.19.1 Environmental assessments may now be required for certain categories of major development (Town and Country Planning (Assessment of Environmental Effects) Regulations, 1988) in the District.

4.19.2 The Town and Country Planning (Assessment of Environmental Effects) Regulations, 1988, defines two categories of development where an Environmental Assessment (E.A.) may be required. Schedule 1 outlines those developments which will automatically require an E.A. such as a major chemical or steel works. Schedule 2 developments are at the discretion of the District Council to decide if the development would result in significant environmental effects. Generally an E.A. will be required for projects that are:-

- of more than local importance;- proposed in particularly sensitive or vulnerable locations;- unusually complex or would have potentially damaging environmental effects.

The District Council feels that there are a number of sensitive or vulnerable areas where an environmental assessment may be required to accompany a planning application relating to a development falling within Schedule 2 of the Town and Country Planning (Assessment of Environmental Effects) Regulations 1988. These include conservation areas, scheduled ancient monuments, ancient woodlands, sites of special scientific interest and other areas of major nature conservation interest, including the River Maun and the Meden valley areas. The above list indicates where an environmental assessment is more likely to be required but does not preclude environmental assessments under Schedule 2 being required in other areas of the District.

continue to Chapter 4b - Natural Environment

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